A multimedia-focused micro-blogging platform on data centers. This site will store creative data center related media on data centers, big data, data center technologies, data analytics, data security, and the Internet. It will also serve as a clearing house for a more respectable tumblr site we are working on: http://diplomatic-internet.tumblr.com/.

19th April 2014

Video with 2 notes

Google’s Amazing Floating Data Centers

19th April 2014

Video

GoDaddy Presents - Data Center Tour

21st March 2014

Video

Selecting a Rack PDU

21st March 2014

Video

Meraki Cloud Architecture Deep Dive with Sean Rhea, PhD Distributed Systems, UC Berkeley

21st March 2014

Link reblogged from The spinning of the given moment's scenarios. with 3 notes

Inside the NSA’s Secret Efforts to Hunt and Hack System Administrators - The Intercept →

0x4e71:

"I hunt sys admins"

21st March 2014

Photo

Graphene Helps Copper Wires Keep Their Cool

An exotic form of carbon could help relieve a growing problem with the copper used in computer processors.
MIT Technology Review |  Katie Bourzac | March 21, 2014


When people in the chip industry talk about the thermal problems in computer processors, they get dramatic. In 2001, Pat Gelsinger, then vice president of Intel, noted that if the temperatures produced by the latest chips kept rising on their current path, they would exceed the heat of a nuclear reactor by 2005, and the surface of the sun by 2015. Fortunately, such thermal disaster was averted by slowing down the switching speeds in microprocessors, and by adopting multicore chip designs in which several processors run in parallel.
Now the semiconductor industry has another thermal problem to sort out. As chip components shrink, the copper wiring that connects them must shrink, too. And as these wires get thinner, they heat up tremendously.
Read more


Photo:  Graphene from iStock Photo

Graphene Helps Copper Wires Keep Their Cool

An exotic form of carbon could help relieve a growing problem with the copper used in computer processors.

MIT Technology Review |  Katie Bourzac | March 21, 2014

When people in the chip industry talk about the thermal problems in computer processors, they get dramatic. In 2001, Pat Gelsinger, then vice president of Intel, noted that if the temperatures produced by the latest chips kept rising on their current path, they would exceed the heat of a nuclear reactor by 2005, and the surface of the sun by 2015. Fortunately, such thermal disaster was averted by slowing down the switching speeds in microprocessors, and by adopting multicore chip designs in which several processors run in parallel.

Now the semiconductor industry has another thermal problem to sort out. As chip components shrink, the copper wiring that connects them must shrink, too. And as these wires get thinner, they heat up tremendously.

Read more

Photo:  Graphene from iStock Photo

20th March 2014

Photo reblogged from A Humble Bumble with 14 notes

Source: computer-muser

16th March 2014

Photoset with 2 notes

16th March 2014

Photo with 2 notes

16th March 2014

Photoset

Dev & Test