A multimedia-focused micro-blogging platform on data centers. This site will store creative data center related media on data centers, big data, data center technologies, data analytics, data security, and the Internet. It will also serve as a clearing house for a more respectable tumblr site we are working on: http://diplomatic-internet.tumblr.com/.

19th October 2014

Link with 1 note

Equipping The Next Generation of Data Center Professionals →

19th October 2014

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This is why you NEVER tip your server. - Imgur

This is why you NEVER tip your server. - Imgur

19th October 2014

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Urban Giants

60 Hudson Street & 32 Avenue of Americas

19th October 2014

Link

Bitcoin Mining Heavyweight Takes Space at CenturyLink Data Centers →

20th September 2014

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US tech industry steps up push on surveillance reforms
AFP News via Yahoo News | 9 Sep 2014

"As a result of the surveillance program revelations, US technology companies have experienced negative economic implications in overseas markets," said a letter endorsed by five major tech organizations that include members such as Google, Microsoft, Apple and Facebook.
"In addition, other countries are considering proposals that would limit data flows between countries, which would have a negative impact on the efficiencies upon which the borderless Internet relies. The transparency measures in the USA Freedom Act are designed to alleviate some of the concerns behind such actions by allowing companies to be more transparent about the orders they receive from the government pursuant to its surveillance authorities."
The measure pending in the Senate would curb the NSA’s ability to collect bulk phone data from Americans and provides more safeguards for warrantless surveillance.
The proposal includes other privacy provisions, including the creation of a special advocate to monitor civil liberties issues before a secret US surveillance court.


CNET | May 2014

In a blog posted on May 13, Cisco general counsel Mark Chandler spoke out against the allegations that the NSA installed surveillance software on Cisco equipment.
"We ought to be able to count on the government to then not interfere with the lawful delivery of our products in the form in which we have manufactured them," Chandler said. "To do otherwise, and to violate legitimate privacy rights of individuals and institutions around the world, undermines confidence in our industry."
Chandler also offered the following suggestions on what governments should do to restore confidence in the tech industry:
Governments should have policies requiring that product security vulnerabilities that are detected be reported promptly to manufacturers for remediation, unless a court finds a compelling reason for a temporary delay. By the same token, governments should not block third parties from reporting such vulnerabilities to manufacturers.
Governments should not interfere with the ability of companies to lawfully deliver internet infrastructure as ordered by their customers.
Clear standards should be set to protect information outside the United States which belongs to third parties, but are in the custody of subsidiaries of US companies, so that customers worldwide can know the rules that will apply and work with confidence with US suppliers.


Silicon Valley Watcher | Dec 2013

Tech split on NSA…
It shows the divide in the US tech industry, missing are IBM, Cisco, Intel, Dell, Oracle, and many other tech giants. It’s precisely these companies that have massive contracts with US government agencies. Criticism of the NSA is an understandable concern, it’s not something that will help them win contracts. However, they will have to weigh their losses in overseas markets against their silence on this issue domestically.

The Week | Nov 2013

But companies’ and countries’ aversion to the NSA seems to miss the bigger picture. Certainly, Edward Snowden’s revelations have disclosed a lot about the scope and shape of the NSA’s spying activities. But there hasn’t been a comparable level of disclosure about the activities of intelligence agencies in foreign countries, including Brazil, Russia, and China. Consumers moving away from American networking companies out of a desire to avoid surveillance, and adopting Chinese networking technology instead, could be jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire. China is still an authoritarian one-party state in which dissidents are routinely put to death. China has an active and overt internet censorship program. Chinese technology products may have just as many backdoors and surveillance technologies as American products — the details just haven’t been leaked.


image source

US tech industry steps up push on surveillance reforms

AFP News via Yahoo News | 9 Sep 2014

"As a result of the surveillance program revelations, US technology companies have experienced negative economic implications in overseas markets," said a letter endorsed by five major tech organizations that include members such as Google, Microsoft, Apple and Facebook.

"In addition, other countries are considering proposals that would limit data flows between countries, which would have a negative impact on the efficiencies upon which the borderless Internet relies. The transparency measures in the USA Freedom Act are designed to alleviate some of the concerns behind such actions by allowing companies to be more transparent about the orders they receive from the government pursuant to its surveillance authorities."

The measure pending in the Senate would curb the NSA’s ability to collect bulk phone data from Americans and provides more safeguards for warrantless surveillance.

The proposal includes other privacy provisions, including the creation of a special advocate to monitor civil liberties issues before a secret US surveillance court.

CNET | May 2014

In a blog posted on May 13, Cisco general counsel Mark Chandler spoke out against the allegations that the NSA installed surveillance software on Cisco equipment.

"We ought to be able to count on the government to then not interfere with the lawful delivery of our products in the form in which we have manufactured them," Chandler said. "To do otherwise, and to violate legitimate privacy rights of individuals and institutions around the world, undermines confidence in our industry."

Chandler also offered the following suggestions on what governments should do to restore confidence in the tech industry:

  • Governments should have policies requiring that product security vulnerabilities that are detected be reported promptly to manufacturers for remediation, unless a court finds a compelling reason for a temporary delay. By the same token, governments should not block third parties from reporting such vulnerabilities to manufacturers.
  • Governments should not interfere with the ability of companies to lawfully deliver internet infrastructure as ordered by their customers.
  • Clear standards should be set to protect information outside the United States which belongs to third parties, but are in the custody of subsidiaries of US companies, so that customers worldwide can know the rules that will apply and work with confidence with US suppliers.

Silicon Valley Watcher | Dec 2013

Tech split on NSA…

It shows the divide in the US tech industry, missing are IBM, Cisco, Intel, Dell, Oracle, and many other tech giants. It’s precisely these companies that have massive contracts with US government agencies. Criticism of the NSA is an understandable concern, it’s not something that will help them win contracts. However, they will have to weigh their losses in overseas markets against their silence on this issue domestically.

The Week | Nov 2013

But companies’ and countries’ aversion to the NSA seems to miss the bigger picture. Certainly, Edward Snowden’s revelations have disclosed a lot about the scope and shape of the NSA’s spying activities. But there hasn’t been a comparable level of disclosure about the activities of intelligence agencies in foreign countries, including Brazil, Russia, and China. Consumers moving away from American networking companies out of a desire to avoid surveillance, and adopting Chinese networking technology instead, could be jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire. China is still an authoritarian one-party state in which dissidents are routinely put to death. China has an active and overt internet censorship program. Chinese technology products may have just as many backdoors and surveillance technologies as American products — the details just haven’t been leaked.

image source

14th September 2014

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Top 10 Fastest Supercomputers 2014 

9th September 2014

Link reblogged from Fight for the Future with 252 notes

It's not enough for this protest to be huge. It has to be massive. Here's what you can do to help. →

fight4future:

image

Hey,

No time to write. There are 30 hours left until the Internet Slowdown protest for net neutrality, and all of us here at FFTF are working round the clock to make this huge.

Everything you need is right here: https://battleforthenet.com/sept10th

Just this morning, Netflix…

16th August 2014

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CERN Construction of the Wigner data center in Hungary

16th August 2014

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Data Center Shutdown Timelapse

27th July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Industrialist with 22 notes

supplyside:

“The thing that most surprised me about the data center was how much of the space was taken up by support systems, and how little space was actually used for servers,” says Arnall. Timo Arnall

supplyside:

“The thing that most surprised me about the data center was how much of the space was taken up by support systems, and how little space was actually used for servers,” says Arnall. Timo Arnall